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"Ageing Well In Birmingham" by the #LunarSociety

Reflecting on the inspiring & relevant event: "Ageing Well In Birmingham" by the #LunarSociety

Although #Birmingham was the focal point much of what was discussed related to major health & social care needs of older people across the #UK.

An ageing population, at any time, brings with it challenge of providing more complex care; we are in an age where the short and long-term effects of #COVID19 are being felt. An example - hospital beds being tied up waiting for a care package to support elderly patients at home leading to immense pressure on the various care service providers. One major question that was addressed was whether this is actually leading to meaningful cross-sector partnership working involving all stakeholders including hospitals and social care services, even the not-so-usual suspects such as the housing sector (such as Extra-Care) and even the legal sector, working together to improve patient care.

Book Review and Launch: “Dementia in Prison: An Ethical Framework to Support Research, Practice and Prisoners”

Professor Joanne Rybacka-Brooke

Director of Centre for Social Care, Health and Related Research

Director of International Dementia and Culture Collaborative

IAH Trustee

The book Dementia in Prison has been written for healthcare professionals, prison staff and all of those who support prisoners. This book is divided into three sections, which commences with an overview of healthcare services within prison settings and the need to develop these to support an aging prison population, followed by an exploration of both the human rights of prisoners with dementia, and ethical considerations of healthcare in the prison setting, including the current support for prisoners with dementia, alongside an overview of ethical processes to enable the development of further research to support older prisoners and those with dementia.

Dr Peter P Mayer, IAH Hon President and Treasurer - Future of the IAH

We need to decide if the Institute should be dissolved or continue at the AGM and seminar on 16 July 2019. We have an executive meeting on 21 May where a recommendation on this needs to be agreed.

Since the last AGM on 18 July 2018,  there has been little interaction with new or old trustees and our Chair Dr Dayani has left Birmingham and will be seeking a replacement.

His view is that there is an important future role in:

“I think the Institute could be very useful as a think-tank/forum for ideas on healthcare issues wider than care of the elderly. It is independent; its membership is largely frontline and academic health and social care workers who have an opportunity to say things as they see them (with appropriate solutions). There is a need for such a voice as unfortunately the NHS and Social Care are failing to impact dramatically on outcomes within the West Midlands and arguably more widely.”

Dr Peter Mayer, IAH Hon. Treasurer - Staying as we are?

What are the implications of the workforce crisis and the fact that we have to change to continue to supply a fit for purpose health care system? I start with selective quotes from Roy Lilley’s daily blog of the 28th February This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
“There is almost no part of the NHS that does not have a people problem.
... changing the way, we do things is painful, uncomfortable and contested but is probably the only way out.

Interwoven are the paradoxes; technology changes faster than we are prepared to evolve our services. Outpatients fingered by Britnell and singled out in the LTP, the unreformed backwater of a 60's NHS.

In an OECD survey 70% of doctors and 80% of nurses reported being over-skilled for aspects of their work. It is a criminal waste.

Britnell calls on us to reframe the debate about workforce-planning and shift our thinking to productivity, health and wealth creation. He has been to 77 countries; he knows what's what.”

Liz Blackham, Queen’s Nurse and IAH Trustee - Loneliness

We as human beings are living longer, and the prevalence of loneliness and isolation among the elderly increases. Is it inevitable?
We are a supposedly civilised society, yet many of our elderly live with virtually no communication with others for weeks on end. We assume they have contact with someone- don’t they?
At present 1 in 3 people over the age of 65 live alone in the UK. Statistics say this is set to increase by more than 50% in the next 25years. While some older adults choose to live alone, others may have no choice.
Loneliness increases the likelihood of mortality by 26%. Research shows that loneliness and social isolation are harmful to our health: lacking social connections is comparable risk factor for early death as smoking 15 cigarettes a day and is worse for us than well known risk factors such as obesity and physical inactivity.

Dr Peter Mayer - Integrated Care Blog

Re-inventing a Long Term Dream: Do we need new systems to deliver “working together” We run a huge risk of repeating the mistakes of the policy 10 (PPM ?70) years ago, thinking that integration is solved just by fiddling with organizational form options” M. Winn 21.5.2018 I have had a career long passion in delivering services across sector boundaries as geriatric service lead of hospital and community health facilities, running the Institute’s Excellent Care Award, participating in the development of Stroke Illness pathways , and as a former chair of joint planning in Birmingham. My purpose with this publication is to seek examples of Good Practice, building on our experience from the “Excellent Care Award” to inform the work now being done under the new national drive to promote integration in commissioning and in delivering health and social care. The driver for this strategy is the long-standing perception that underfunded fragmented poorly delivered services can be reorganized to provide cost effective services with the person in need at the centre of the change required. The World Health Organisation (WHO) and NHS England (NHSE) see the patient/citizen as the pivot round which service configuration should be structured. But most service planning is initiated centrally and in the recent Sustainability Transformation Partnerships (STPs now becoming Integrated Care Systems (ICS)) the service user seems the last group involved in planning and driving service change. NHS clinical commissioning groups (CCGs) do have a requirement to consult their populations and some are doing this well but many are too small and lack the skills to deliver.

Dr Andrew Dayani Introduction

Hello from the new Chair

As the newly elected Chair, I thought this may be an opportune moment to introduce myself and lay out a little of my vision for the Institute, given all that is happening within the West Midlands.

So, Hello! My name is Dr Andrew Dayani. I am Executive Medical Director at Birmingham Community Healthcare NHS FT and was a GP for 21 years before moving into an Executive Director role. That gives you a flavour, but doesn’t tell the whole story, as I have also been an Occupational Physician, Community Hospital doctor and trained in Dermatology and Cardiology, whilst being involved in commissioning and medical politics. I like to keep busy!  Until last year I lived and worked in Somerset.

More infomation, less assessability

More Information, Less Accessibility
Mike Marshall MIHM, DHSM – IAH Trustee

I have probably driven my Trustee colleagues to distraction over completing my first ever blog for the West Midlands Institute of Ageing and Health. It was due in January 2018 and I was ill at the time. Since then holidays, retired life and procrastination seem to have got in the way. It’s always been the same: as a Health and Social Care practitioner / Manager/ Commissioner - reports finished at the deadline and funding bids submitted on the day (the last of which gained £2.3 million from the Government!).
 
Well, here I am finally at the keyboard, relatively fit and able, unlike many of the older people we seek to support through the Institute’s work.
I can travel to my GP, access hospital appointments (unfortunately not in my home town of Bromsgrove in the actual community hospital I commissioned) but in Redditch (or Kidderminster) some 7 miles away.
 
Should I have experienced a stroke the journey would be to Evesham, 48 miles round-trip with no direct bus route. Trains? Forget it. Older relative, no car? – no chance.

The British Geriatric Society

The success of modern medicine has resulted in many people surviving strokes, heart attacks and cancer when previously they would have died prematurely. This has resulted in an ageing population.  With this changing demographic comes the challenge of how to achieve healthy ageing.  Sadly many older people are not achieving this, and the numbers of older people living with frailty are rising.  People living with frailty often have multiple chronic illnesses, weak muscles, poor mobility, exhaustion and are dependent on others for their care (Clegg, 2013).  They are the main users of heath and social care and have high mortality (Shamliyan, 2013).  Decisions around care choices are often complex, particularly where patients have dementia or are coming to the end of life.  Choices must take into account patient preferences as well as what is achievable and sensible to maintain a good quality of life. 

Call for articles for our journal Ageing and Health

https://www.bgs.org.uk/sites/default/files/content/attachment/2019-11-13/BGS%20General%20Election%20Manifesto%202019%20FINAL.pdf

https://medium.com/@CareQualityComm/kate-terronis-blog-d92a2c3f194

The main objective of our journal is to provide a platform for carers, older people, healthcare practitioners, students, academics and researchers to share their experiences and/or research in the field of working with, and for, older people. Ageing and Health aims to promote and share areas of excellent practice that promotes wellbeing for older people.

The journal is currently published in print but we intend to move to online in the future.

Ageing and Health publishes original papers, review papers, conceptual frameworks, case studies, empirical research, book reviews, discussion papers, audits/evaluations of services, poems, literature reviews, etc.

We welcome new authors as well as those with experience in publishing.

Deadline for articles: Monday 14 August 2017

Information for authors is available from the website www.iah-wmids.org.uk or email Jeanette Lane at here.

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