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RCN Local Learning Events

The Institute of Ageing and Health works alongside other organisations to raise issues facing older people in our society.

This year we are supporting the Royal College of Nursing’s Local Learning Event Programme in the West Midlands to help educate nursing staff around this important agenda. Click here for the programme of events.

One Day Conference

Institute of Ageing and health west midlandsAll health professionals welcome.
Date: Friday 17th November 2017
Time: 0930-1600 (sandwich lunch provided)
Cost: £30 (students £15) includes free membership to the IAH

The Institute of Ageing and Health is delighted to invite you to attend this year’s annual conference on how we can support older people to stay out of hospital and stay well at home.

Click here to read more.

Become an IAH Member

Membership of the Institute is available to anybody who has an interest in older people. As the emphasis of the Institute is on inter-disciplinary working, our membership is particularly appropriate for people who wish to share skills and knowledge with others. Whilst the geographical focus of the Institute is the West Midlands, membership is open to anyone who shares our objective.

Call for papers

The IAH invites papers for its journal 'Ageing & Health'. Contributions to Ageing & Health enable us to share research, reflections and stories to help improve ageing and health in the West Midlands; we are looking for articles that present views and perspectives from a wide variety of disciplines related to health and ageing.

The deadline for articles for our next journal is Monday 14 August 2017.

Latest Blogs

Latest Blogs

Dementia and Advance Care Planning: who needs to take responsibility?

Death and preferred end of life care can be a difficult discussion for any individual living with terminal illness. However, when that conversation is with someone diagnosed with dementia – and therefore, may not have the mental capacity to plan and organise for the future – it can become a lot more challenging.

Advanced Care Planning (ACP) is instrumental in ensuring a patient with dementia – and any other individual living with a life-limiting illness – has the right care and support in place to enable them to live their last days in peace and dignity. Yet, despite its obvious benefits, the responsibility of ACP doesn’t directly lie with one specific healthcare professional. Instead, it is up to any healthcare professional to raise the conversation when they think it is most appropriate for the individual.

Read more

Managing Long Term Pain

‘Sorrow that finds no vent in tears may make other organs weep’

Sir Henry Maudsley, 1835 – 1918

 According to the British Pain Society, almost 10 million Britons suffer pain almost daily resulting in a major impact on their quality of life and more days off work at a cost estimated at around £5billion per annum, with around 20% of all new consultations involving pain. Long term pain is both disabling and distressing. The story of Gill Pharoah, a former palliative care nurse who passed away at the age of 75 at an assisted dying clinic in Switzerland in 2015 with chronic back pain raises important questions about euthanasia and the traumas that can come with old age not just in the context of terminal illness, but also for conditions which can ruin people’s quality of life. It also raises important questions about ageism and how society values elderly people.

Read more

End of Life Care and Dementia

Sue Lillyman, IAH Trustee

With dementia noted as the leading cause of deaths in England and Wales in 2015 (Office of National Statistics 2016) and with approximately 860,000 people living with dementia, which is still estimated to rise to 1,142,677 by 2025 (Alzheimer’s Society 2014) there is a need for people to discuss, prepare and provide optimal care for people with dementia at the end of life. Everyone has a fundamental right to die with dignity, be safe and protected from harm (DoH 2013) but, as noted by some researchers, the traditional palliative care model used for many other long-term conditions does not fit people dying with, and from, dementia (Bloomer et al 2011). Therefore, it is timely that we review specific needs for this group including behavioural concerns, discussions in relation to preparing for end of life, difficulty re placement of care, carer burden and over burdensome and/or under treatment in our discussions and education (Torke et al 2010).

Read more

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